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SUMMARIES OF MAJOR  ACCIDENT REPORTS
(In event order)

THE KULLUK INCIDENT
December 2012
THE COSTA CONCORDIA
January 2012
THE TRINITY II
September 2011
THE DEEPWATER HORIZON
April 2010
THE BOURBON DOLPHIN
April 2007
THE STEVNS POWER
October 2003
THE OCEAN RANGER
February 1982
THE OCEAN EXPRESS
April 1976

PICTURE OF THE DAY
PIC OF THE DAY ARCHIVES
2007 - 77 Photographs
2008 - 101 Photographs
2009 - 124 Photographs
2010 - 118 Photographs
2011 - 100 Photographs
2012 - 97 Photographs

 

 

         

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HISTORY OF THE UT704

This is an article written in 1991 about the UT704 followed by a table showing all the UT704s built with their past and present names, courtesy of Torleif Martin Klokset. 

The UT704 is probably the most prolific supply vessel type ever built, and may only be exceeded in numbers as a ship type by the American Liberty and Victory ships built during and after the Second World War, a total of ninety one having been built all over the world between 1975 and 1987.

Designed in Norway by the Ulstein Group the first appeared in 1975, and by the end of 1976 nineteen ships had been built all for Norwegian owners, and all but two operated under the Norwegian flag. They allowed the Norwegians to become a major force in the British sector which up to that time had been dominated by traditional British ship-owners like Blue Funnel which operated in partnership with the Inchcape Group under the name of OIL, and Cunard which operated under the name of Offshore Marine.

The British made the first steps from the Gulf of Mexico designs to a type of ship which was specifically designed to deal with the rougher waters and more arduous tasks of the North Sea. The funnels were moved from the after deck to a position aft of the bridge and the winches were enclosed and powered by electric or hydraulic motors, rather than standing on the after deck, with a diesel engine providing the power.

The UT704 was a quantum leap forward. The first vessel to enter service was the Skaustream built in Finland by Oy Laivarteolisuus, who also built three further vessels in the same year. It was powered by two Nohab diesels giving 7040 BHP, and was provided with a single 500bhp bow thruster. In this configuration bollard pulls of between 90 and 100 tons were claimed for the design.

Accommodation was spartan by today's standards, the winch being set well forward between the funnels giving a clear deck area of 124ft by 36ft.

By 1991 standards the specification would be considered extremely conservative but in those days it was the ship which had everything.

It seemed to have combined all the possible requirements for offshore anchor handling and supply operations in a single vessel without sacrificing anything. Some of the Smitt-Lloyd and OSA ships of the period were superior in engine power but invariably they had less available deck space, and in the case of the Smitt-Lloyd vessels the master was still required to stand at the controls. The majority of the British ships of the period were dimensionally smaller, and generally lighter in construction. Indeed all these companies seemed wedded to their designs, which in a way is not surprising since they were generally subsidiaries of deepsea ship owners whose trade marks were often the actual shape of the ships. It was therefore against their whole philosophy to accept a standard type with no sign of their personal imprint.

Consequently in the years which followed most of the British, Dutch and German supply ship owners persisted with modifications to their earlier ships types, and painted them in their traditional colour schemes. Oil's was typical of British deepsea vessels, black hull, white upperworks and green decks. The Norwegians on the other hand bought UT704s off the shelf, and usually painted them orange - orange hull, orange upperworks and orange deck, the only distinguishing feature being the funnels and the names.

The design was the first to incorporated rounded quarters to allow the tow wire free movement during turns. Up to that time naval architects had attempted to emulate the stern of type traditional tug in the towing mode, while providing a roller for decking the anchors during rig shifts. This necessitated the closing of a gate under the tow wire to provide free movement, and required a certain amount of dexterity on the part of the deck crews who had to make the initial connection with the gate open, and then close it under the wire.

However the moulded quarters required the provision of some means of restricting the movement of the wires during anchor handling and for this purpose the 704s were provided with hydraulic pins which rose out of the deck and trapped the wire, almost incidentally making the operation 100% safer.

The design also moved the winch controls from a deck-house ahead of the winch to a position on the bridge. This at a stroke improved communication between the Master and the Chief Engineer, who operated the winch, improved visibility and kept the Chief warm. Later the Master was also given much improved visibility while manoeuvring, the vessel being provided with a full length window at the after end, although in the earliest ships the funnels restricted vision on the quarters. Later this problem was solved by reducing the funnel height and extending the exhausts from the top.

After the initial flurry of vessels in 1975 and 1976 there was a reduction in construction generally due to the inevitable boom and bust cycles of the industry, however three vessels were constructed by Ultsteins for the Russians in 1977 and two ships constructed in Spain in 1978. One of these ships, the Dee Service is still working out of Lowestoft for Shell in the Southern North Sea.

In 1979, with the North Sea still in something of an over supply situation two ships were constructed in Canada and two in Finland for Huawei Offshore of Hongkong, and in 1980 a further four of the type were built, two in Poland for Petrobaltic and two in Korea which Danish ship-owners AP Moller purchased while they were under construction, for operation in the Far East.

The two Maersk vessels are unique in being provided with wire operated controls rather than air controls which were generally being used at the time. The reason for this specification are lost in the mists of time, but the two ships are till active in Far Eastern waters, and it is a requirement that the Masters engage in a prolonged period of weight training before taking command.

By 1981 there was a general increase in offshore exploration activity world wide and as a result 14 UT704s were built, the spread of builders and owners illustrating the world wide popularity of the design. Two were built in Australia for Australian owners, two by Ulsteins For Huawei Offshore of Hong Kong, four in other Norwegian yards for Norwegian owners, two in Norway for the Russians and four in Italy for SNAM/AGIP

1982 saw the brief ascendancy of the Norwegian shipping magnate Parli Augusonn who by the end of 1983 had become owner or manager of ten newly built UT704s, and it might have been eleven had not British tug Operator Alexander Towing purchased one of the two being constructed at Tangen Werft in 1983.

This vessel went on to become one of the best known 704s in the British sector since as well as operating as an oil rig support vessel it also undertook long range towing activities. In 1989 it towed the barge Goliath Atlantic on which was loaded the jack-up Zapata Heritage, from the Gulf of Mexico to Singapore, a distance of some 13500 miles. This was the longest tow ever undertaken by Alexander Towing.

1983 also saw the construction of five 704s in the Yugoslavian yard of Totovo. These vessels were intended for operation with the Yugoslav National Oil Company but did not enter service, three of them being purchased by Smitt-Lloyd, at last acknowledging the qualities of the design, and two being bareboated to British support company BUE, being named British Forties and British Auk.

UT704.jpg (39922 bytes) One of the vessels constructed in Yugoslavia now returned to Croatian ownership - the Brodaspas Rainbow

Two of the Smitt-Lloyd vessels were dispatched to the North Sea, and the third was immediately long term chartered by Conoco Egypt, and Smitt-Lloyd offered the wife of Conoco Egypt's Chief Executive the privilege of naming the vessel. This did not prove possible during it's service in the Red Sea and so it was decided to carry out the ceremony when she returned to Europe.

However in the days immediately before the ceremony was due to take place the ship sustained bottom damage in the Shetlands. Any other company would probably have called the whole thing off, but Smitt-Lloyd commendably image conscious still steamed the ship to Aberdeen where the oil industry assembled under a marquee on the afterdeck to watch the champagne being cracked over a suitably ceremonial anvil.

It is still remembered by a few of the guests that it was difficult to hear themselves speak over the noise of fixed and portable pumps in the bowels of the ship, and that there was a distinct lack of the usual liquid hospitality before everyone was hustled down the gangway too allow the craft to steam rapidly to Hall Russell's dry-dock.

1982 and 1983 also saw four ships built for Tidewaters at the Kristiansund yard of Sterkoder Mek Verstad, though only one of these vessels, the Majestic Tide, has consistently operated in the North Sea. Tidewater incidentally claim the credit for initiating the whole design when they commissioned the Mammoth Tide and Goliath Tide from Ulsteins in 1974. These vessels were 218ft long with 8000 BHP provided by four engines. They were then the most powerful vessels ever constructed for the offshore oil industry and cost $3,000,000 each.

In the development of ship types, builders certainly benefit from fulfilling the requirements of their customers, so there is no reason to suppose that this is not so. Indeed, in modifying the design at the behest of British supply vessel operators Star Offshore, for the Star Polaris, Ulsteins almost incidentally produced the successor to the 704.

The Star Polaris was built in 1983, and was designated a UT704 MkIII. Although the hull form was more or less standard the company had required that additional accommodation be provided and that the ship have superior bollard pull to the older vessels.

The ship was consequently fitted with a very distinctive superstructure and the keel raked to accommodate larger screws. She was powered by two Warsila Vasa engines producing 9000 bhp. She was also fitted with twin workdrums to upgrade her anchor-handling capability. These drums were of such large dimensions that when the Semi-submersible rig Pentagon 84 broke anchor wires in rough weather the Polaris was able to recover 6000 ft of 72 mm wire, return the end to the rig and re-lay the anchor.

This vessel was followed by a second 704 MkIII, which was the last built for the Balder fleet. However amidst the wholesale dispersal of the Balder Company the ship entered service as the Schelde owned by the Dalia Shipping Company of Holland. This vessel's power was upgraded to 11,000 BHP making it the most powerful 704 to be built. It is now owned by Viking Supply Ships and operated under the name of Arild Viking.

Only three further 704s were to be built, two in 1986 by Malta Drydocks for the Chinese National Shipping Company, and the last being the Ballatine apparently built in Hall Russell's in Aberdeen. This last vessel was actually a hull purchased by Balravie shipping in Norway and towed to Aberdeen. Balravie contracted with Hall Russells to complete the ship as a particularly high specification vessel, the main change being to alter the power units from standard diesel drive to diesel electric. However during the rebuilding both Balravie Shipping and Hall Russells filed for bankruptcy so work on the ship ceased. It was purchased by Shell from the receivers whose only interest was the three generators which they removed to power thrusters on the Fulmar FSU, an offshore storage facility which had demonstrated the need for such refinements by breaking free of it's moorings during severe winter weather in early 1989.

The hull was purchased by Norwegian shipowners Berge Partners who had plans to lengthen her and put her into service. With this in mind she was made safe and towed back to Norway. At the time of writing it is rumoured that the hull is still lying in a fjord awaiting attention.

Meanwhile both Star Offshore and Ulsteins had learnt lessons from the Star Polaris and the companies collaborated in the development of the UT734, visually similar to the 704 MkIII but slightly larger with better bulk carrying capabilities. So far three of this type have been built, the Star Sirius and Star Spica for Star Offshore and the Northern Frontier for Stobakk & Voll of Norway. The fourth of the Series in good 704 tradition is currently under construction in Dae Dong Shipyard, Singapore, for Vietso-Petro of Vietnam.

Offshore supply vessels are proving to have an extremely long operating life, though there is a tendency for them to move from areas where intensive activity and difficult weather conditions are prevalent to places where the environment is kinder to older ships.

As a consequence there are only a few 704s in the North Sea, while most are finding gainful employment in the Far East and elsewhere. Noteworthy exceptions are the Rioni the Russian 704 built in Finland in 1983. This vessel after a prolonged period of lay-up in the Baltic is currently employed by Amoco and managed by BUE, who had their bareboated ships reclaimed by the Yugoslavs - now named the Brodospas 51 and Brodospas 52, and sold their wholly owned 704s to a Norwegian operator.

Also on the spot market in Great Yarmouth is the Polish owned Granit built by Szczecin Shipyard in 1980, and at least one of the Smitt-Lloyd 704s is still active in Aberdeen. Farstad operate the Far Supporter, formerly the Marine Supporter out of Aberdeen and Viking and Star have consistently found work for the two 704 MkIIIs on the UK Continental Shelf.

704s are also playing their part in the development of more efficient standby fleets in the wake of the Piper Alpha disaster. In 1989 the then BUE owned ship the British Claymore was modified for standby duties for the Forties Field at a cost of œ400,000. This enabled her to carry 250 survivors, and currently Danish Standby boat operators Esbjerg Vagtskibsselskab operate a fully updated 704 as the Esvagt Delta.

To attempt to encompass the changes of ownership of most of these craft over the last ten years would produce little more than a boring list of names, so it is probably sufficient to say that most 704s have had at least three owners during their working lives, and some as many as five.

They have been traded in the second hand market continuously, the prices following the fortunes of the supply vessel industry. It is interesting to see that the largest operators of 704s are Viking Supply ships who have a total of 11 in service. As to be expected six of the vessels are working in the Far East and five, including the Arild Viking - formerly King Supplier - formerly Schelde - formerly Balder Schelde -(See what I mean) in the North Sea. Their fleet included some of the earliest 704s, the Erik Viking and the Olaf Viking which were built together with the Skausteam in Finland in 1975. The also own several former Omega vessels two of which were the Atlantic Blaana and the Atlantic Vest. The Atlantic Blaana was also once owned by the demised Balravie Shipping, who operated in briefly out of Aberdeen in a generally distressed state, before selling it on.

In the UK Sealion Shipping manage the Toisa Intrepid, which was the Omega 803 after it was the Terra Nova Sea, and it was something else before that. The Invincible has moved on having been sold by Alexander Towing to the Italians, the general criterion being that anyone who purchased a 704 five years ago can make a great deal of money out of it now, and there seems no doubt that the improved specification for standby vessels will soon begin to make all 704s eligible for conversion, probably giving them another 20 years of life.

The UT 704 has had an inestimable impact on the offshore industry world wide. It set a whole new standard for anchor-handlers, and has directly contributed to the development of it's successor the 734, though due to the general increase in the size of anchor-handlers, the market for this vessel will doubtless be more limited. It also spawned a direct derivative, the UT714, which was a smaller but almost identical vessel of some 5000bhp of which 37 were built mainly in India in 1983 and 1984.

It generated a respect for Ulstein as a shipbuilder, and Norwegian supply vessel designers in general which they have never lost, and as a result all current newbuildings of platform supply vessels for the North Sea are to Ulstein designs, and all current newbuildings of anchor-handlers come from the drawing boards of Norwegian Naval Architects.

It is probable that when the last UT704 is finally retired the next anchor-handler to be commissioned, what-ever it's specification, and where-ever it is built, will incorporate some of the features which made the 704 the ultimate supply vessel in 1975, and in terms of importance in the history of the offshore support industry the Skaustream must rate only slightly lower on the scale than the first supply vessel, the Ebb Tide.

Vic Gibson - The list of vessels follows, but if you want to return to "Features" Click Here

  

BYGGENAVN

BYGGEÅR

BYGGEVERFT

NOVERANDE NAVN

ANDRE NAMN

STAD SCOTSMAN

1975

ULSTEIN HATLØ

SEABULK CONDOR

FAR SCOTSMAN, RED CONDOR

STAD SKY

1975

ULSTEIN HATLØ

OCEAN SKY

FAR SKY 86 - 90 PAN SKY 90 - 95

ADLER SUPPLIER

1975

LAIVATEOLISUUS

ASSI UNDICI

SKAUSTREAM, FOREST STREAM

DUKE SUPPLIER

1975

LAIVATEOLISUUS

INTERGULF

SKAULAKE, FOREST LAKE

ERIK VIKING

1975

LAIVATEOLISUUS

SEABULK COOT 1

SKAUHILL, RED COOT 1

OLAV VIKING

1975

LAIVATEOLISUUS

SEABULK COOT 2

SKAUTOP, RED COOT 2

TENDER SENIOR

1975

SURKEN

SEABULK HAWK

RED HAWK

TENDER SEARCHER

1975

SURKEN

HAVILA SEARCHER

FAR S., PAN S., PLAN SEARCHER, REM SEARCHER

WILMA MERMAID

1975

SMEDVIK

ACQUA AZZURA

OMEGA 804

STAD SEA

1975

ULSTEIN HATLØ

SEABULK FALCON II

RED FALCON

SEAFORTH COMMANDER

1975

BROOK MARINE

TALAL 6401

FRASER SALVATOR

SEAFORTH LAIRD

1975

BROOK MARINE

ESVAGT OMEGA

OMEGA 807, LOVAT SALVATOR

ACTIVE KING

1975

TRONDHJEM

SAPA

PAN KING, CONSTANZA

LOWLAND RAIDER

1976

ULSTEIN HATLØ

BOA PRINCE

ACTIVE PRINCE, LOWLAND RIDER, OSA R., SCOTSMAN

ACTIVE REY

1976

TRONDHJEM

QUEEN SUPPLIER

JAVA SUN, PAN SUN

STAD SUPPLIER

1976

ULSTEIN HATLØ

VIKING PRINCE

WILBUR MARINER

1976

SMEDVIK

ASQUA CHIARA

OMEGA 805

ALMUDENA DEL MAR

1976

SANTANDER

ALPHA 801

GATTOPARDO

CHARO DEL MAR

1976

SANTANDER

PACIFIC JAGUAR

ALPHA 802

SAMUR

1977

ULSTEIN HATLØ

SAMUR

ARAKS

1977

ULSTEIN HATLØ

SAO MAI 3

CURA

1977

ULSTEIN HATLØ

CURA

EDDA BOY

1978

SANTANDER

VIKING BOY

LEVERT SOM EDDA JARL

DEE SERVICE

1978

SANTANDER

DEE SERVICE

DEE SHORE

OFFSHORE TRADER

1979

MARYSTOWN

TERRA NOVA SEA

NORMAND TRADER

OFFSHORE HUNTER

1979

MARYSTOWN

TRIUMPH SEA

NORMAND HUNTER , KONGSHOLM

HUAHAI

1979

WARTSILA

HUAHAI

BALDER VAASA

HUAYANG

1979

WARTSILA

HUAYANG

BALDER TUURKU

ATLANTIC BLAANA

1979

STERKODER

PACIFIC COMMANDER

BALLANTRAE , OMEGA , BERIT VIKING

GRANIT

1980

SZCZECIN

GRANIT

BAZALT

1980

SZCZECIN

BAZALT

MAERSK HANDLER

1980

SAMSUNG

CARANQUE

LEV. SOM ATLAS TASMAN

MAERSK HELPER

1980

SAMSUNG

SEABULK CORMORANT

LEV. SOM SMIT-LLOYD 118

ATLAS VAN DIEMEN

1981

STATE DOCKYARD

AN BANG

LADY LORRAINE

ATLAS DAMPIER

1981

STATE DOCKYARD

LADY CAROLINE

HUACAI

1981

ULSTEIN HATLØ

SAO MAI 01

BALDER RUNDE , RUNDE SUPPLIER

HUAJEN

1981

ULSTEIN SMEDVIK

HUAJEN

BALDER FOSNA

SAFE ANGLIA

1981

STORVIK

INVICIBLE TIDE

ATLANTIC NOR , BERGEN ANGLIA , QUEEN SUPPLIER , TOM VIKING

ACTIVE QUEEN

1981

STERKODER

OSA VIGILANT

VIKING LADY

ACTIVE BOY

1981

LANGSTEIN

PACIFIC CHAMPION

PORONAI

1981

ULSTEIN HATLØ

SAO MAI 02

LITOGA

1981

STERKODER

LITOGA

AGIP NAUTILUS

1981

SGORBINI

ASSO DICIOTTO

AGIP NUREX

1981

SGORBINI

AGIP BELLEROPHON

1981

SEC , ITALIA

GRAMPIAN PRINCE

AL-MOJIL XXXV

AGIP GRYPHAEA

1981

SEC , ITALIA

PUTFORD ROVER

AL-MOJIL XXXIV

VIKING GIRL

1981

KAARBØS

BIN HAI 291

ATLANTIC VEST

1982

STERKODER

RT REDNET

AQUALANTIC , BALLOCHMYLE , OMEGA 809 , BIRGITTE VIKING

ATLANTIC ROLWI

1982

BRATTVÅG

PACIFIC CENTURION

BALDER RISSA

1982

FOSEN

PACIFIC COMMODORE

RISSA SUPPLIER , OMEGA 806 , SONYA VIKING

ODIN VIKING

1982

ULSTEIN SMEDVIK

TROMS TJELD

BALDER TORUNGEN

1982

AKER TANGEN

MASSIVE TIDE

TORUNGEN SUPPLIER , TERJE VIKING

BALDER VIGEN

1982

AKER TANGEN

PACIFIC CONQUEROR

VIKING PRINCE , VIGEN SUPPLIER , OMEGA 801 , MARIT VIKING

BRITISH FORTIES

1983

TITOVO

BRODOSPAS RAINBOW

LEV. SOM BALDER ADRIATIC

BRITISH AUK

1982

TITOVO

BRODOSPAS STORM

LEV. SOM BALDER RIJEKA , EX. BRITISH AUK

BALDER HUSUM

1982

HUSUMER

OSA VISCOUNT

BRITISH TARTAN , LANCELOT GULF

BALDER BORKUM

1982

HUSUMER

OSA VICTOR

BRITISH HEATHER , LANCELOT FJORD

BALDER HANSA

1982

TANGEN VERFT

OSA VENTURE

BRITISH PIPER , LANCELOT CLIFF ,

BALDER HEIDE

1982

TANGEN VERFT

OSA VALIANT

BRITISH EMERALD , LANCELOT BAY

BRUTE TIDE

1982

STERKODER

BRUTE TIDE

MAJESTIC TIDE

1982

STERKODER

MAJESTIC TIDE

NORMAND RANGER

1982

HAUGESUND

NORMAND RANGER

NORMAND PROSPER

1983

HAUGESUND

NORMAND PROSPER

BRITISH CLAYMORE

1983

ROBB CALEDON

A H PARAGGI

LEVERT SOM BALDER LEITH

SMIT-LLOYD 90

1983

TITOVO

SMIT-LLOYD 90

SMIT-LLOYD 91

1983

TITOVO

SEACOR LILEN

BALDER HESNES

1983

TANGEN VERFT

OIL VALOUR

TOISA INTREPID

INVINCIBLE

1983

TANGEN VERFT

ASSO DIECI

LEV. SOM BALDER AARSETH

MIGHTY TIDE

1983

STERKODER

MIGHTY TIDE

MASTER TIDE

1983

STERKODER

MASTER TIDE

BALDER HARSTAD

1983

KAARBØS

PACIFIC SENTINEL

BALDER HAMMERFEST

1983

KAARBØS

BIN HAI 283

NORMAND CORONA , JIN HAI I

BRITISH THISTLE

1982

BÅTSERVICE

OSA VOUAGER

LEVERT SOM BALDER MANDAL

RIONI

1983

LAIVATEOLISUUS

GEMI KURTARAN

YARENGA

1984

LAIVATEOLISUUS

YARENGA

OM

1984

LAIVATEOLISUUS

OM

NERCHA

1985

LAIVATEOLISUUS

NERCHA

ATREK

1983

WARTSILA

ATREK

ANDOGA

1983

WARTSILA

ANDOGA

ATMIS

1983

WARTSILA

LAM SON 1

AURA

1983

WARTSILA

AURA

MORTIER

1982

MARYSTOWN

MIMOSA

ACADIAN GAIL , LAILA VIKING

SMIT-LLOYD 92

1983

TITOVO

ESVAGT GAMMA

MARIN SUPPORTER

1983

FALKENBERG

PACIFIC CHALLENGER 1

FAR SUPPORTER

BALDER KIEL

1983

HUSUMER

OSA VANGUARD

BRITISH FULMAR , LANCELOT CAPE

ACADIAN GAIL

1983

ULSTEIN HATLØ

STAR POLARIS

1983

ULSTEIN HATLØ

OIL VIBRANT

SALVANQUISH

BALDER SCHELDE

1984

PATTJE

NORTHERN COMRADE

SCHELDE KING SUPPLIER ARILD VIKING

NANHAI 210

1986

MALTA

NAN HAI 210

NANHAI 211

1986

MALTA

NAN HAI 211

TORBAS

1993

HUSUMER

HAVILA CHARMER

TO RETURN TO FEATURES INDEX CLICK HERE

FEATURES

THE DEEPWATER HORIZON
Deepwater Horizon -The President's Report
Deepwater Horizon - The Progess of the Event

OTHER ACCIDENTS
The KULLUK Grounding
The Costa Concordia Report
The Costa Concordia Grounding
The Elgin Gas Leak
The Loss of the Normand Rough
The Bourbon Dolphin Accident
The Loss of the Stevns Power
Another Marine Disaster
Something About the P36
The Cormorant Alpha Accident
The Ocean Ranger Disaster
The Loss of the Ocean Express

OPERATIONS
The Life of the Oil Mariner
Offshore Technology and the Kursk
The Sovereign Explorer and the Black Marlin

SAFETY
Safety Case and SEMS
Practical Safety Case Development
Preventing Fires and Explosions Offshore
The ALARP Demonstration
PFEER, DCR and Verification
PFEER and the Dacon Scoop
Human Error and Heavy Weather Damage
Lifeboats & Offshore Installations
More about PFEER
The Offshore Safety Regime - Fit for the Next Decade
The Safety Case and its Future
Jigsaw
Collision Risk Management
Shuttle Tanker Collisions
A Good Prospect of Recovery

TECHNICAL
The History of the UT 704
The Peterhead Connection
Goodbye Kiss
Uses for New Ships
Supporting Deepwater Drilling
Jack-up Moving - An Overview
Seismic Surveying
Breaking the Ice
Tank Cleaning and the Environment
More about Mud Tank Cleaning
Datatrac
Tank Cleaning in 2004
Glossary of Terms

CREATIVE WRITING
An Unusual Investigation
Gaia and Oil Pollution
The True Price of Oil
Icebergs and Anchor-Handlers
Atlantic SOS
The Greatest Influence
How It Used to Be
Homemade Pizza
Goodbye Far Turbot
The Ship Manager
Running Aground
A Cook's Tale
Navigating the Channel
The Captain's Letter

GENERAL INTEREST
The Sealaunch Project
Ghost Ships of Hartlepool
Beam Him Up Scotty
Q790
The Bilbao OSV Conference