WWW.SHIPSANDOIL.COM
home   Picture of the Day     ship information   articles and features     news and views   publications   webcam 

 

HOME
PICTURE OF THE DAY
NORTH EUROPEAN SHIPS
SOUTH ATLANTIC AND CARRIBEAN
INDIA AND INDIAN OCEAN
NORTH AMERICAN SHIPS
FAR EAST AND AUSTRALIA
MEDITERRANEAN AND MIDDLE EAST
ARTICLES AND FEATURES
NEWS AND VIEWS
PUBLICATIONS
WEBCAM
 

VIKING STANDBY

Viking Standby used to be part of the Norwegian Company, Viking Supply but when that company sold their support vessels to Trico, the standby vessels were left on their own, operating out of their base at Montrose.

This company had purchased the old Cam Shipping fleet and as a result had a pretty diverse set of ships on their books some of them reaching the end of the useful life. They were however the proud owners of the Viking Provider, as substantial craft in the modern mould which will doubtless be their blueprint for the future.

In the early part of 2003 BUE and Viking became one company and Viking moved their offices from Montrose to Aberdeen. A new colour scheme was put in place with a variety of results due to the interpretations of those doing the painting.

During the 4th quarter of 2004 there was a further change in the ownership of the this company when the Viking part bought out the BUE part - we think.

As time has gone on (this written in February 2007) Viking Standby has established itself, to the point that we are just a bit fed up with black and yellow stripes. At present they have ships on order, and the whole business is thriving as the industrry goes into hyperdrive.

Only the single modern ship is included here, but more can be found on the BUE/Viking page. During the development and the disappearance of this company I did not include ERRVs in the pages. I may start doing it, given time.

Reviewed 24/5/12 (For the last time) 

SHIP TYPE

NOW

ORDERED

 

AHTS Under 10000 bhp - -
AHTS 10000bhp to 20000bhp - -
AHTS 20000 bhp and over - -
Seismic ships - -
Heavy lift ships - -
Pipelayers - -
IMR ships - -
PSVs deck less than 1000 m2 - -
PSVs deck 1000 m2 + - -
SBSs/ERRVs - -




IMT SEASUPPORTER 1800 VIKING PROVIDER Photo: Vic Gibson
General Propulsion Rescue Equip
Length OA 68 m Engines MAK Survivors Capacity  
Breadth 14.5 m BHP 4800 Kw FRCs  
DWT   For'd Thrusters  1 x azimuth Daughter Craft 2 x Munin
Deck area   Aft Thrusters   Dacon Scoop
    Joystick      
Year built 1999 DP      
Shipyard Husumer Tank Cleaning      

The Viking Provider was added to the Viking Standby fleet on 13th May 1999 only 12 months after the order was placed for its construction at the German yard of Husumer Schiffswerft.

The ship is an IMT Sea Supporter 1800 class vessel designed by IMT Marine Consultants of Montrose. Co-incidentally Viking's office is in Montrose and the ship is registered in the port.

The Viking Provider has been taken on long term charter by Elf Exploration for use on the Elgin, Franklin and Shearwater Fields. It is the latest manifestation of the efforts being made by the oil companies to provide standby vessel support in a manner which is likely to conform the UK PFEER Regulation 17. Regulation 17 states that in the event that personnel end up in the sea due to a catastrophic event, a helicopter crash or falling overboard, they must be provided with "a good prospect of recovery."

The ship is known in the publicity literature as a "multi-function support vessel" which means in the case of the Viking Provider that it can carry a limited amount of deck cargo and a quantity of fuel and potable water to the field when it carries out its crew change voyage. Additionally it can be used for interfield transfers.

Its two MAK engines develop a total of 4800 kW which gives it 63 tonnes of bollard pull, however it is not provided with either a winch or a roller. Instead it has a substantial staghorn in the middle of the deck aft and a towing hook fitted at the aft end of the accommodation. The staghorn is to enable it to tow lifeboats should such be necessary and the towing hook is to allow it to take a drifting vessel in tow by means of the latter's insurance wire.

The ship is 68 meters long 14.5 meters wide and has substantial freeboard. The covered in forecastle which results in an open deck space for use as a helicopter winching area gives it a muscular look which is enhanced by the blunt fendered bow, provided in case it is required to push anything.

Standby vessels which support more than one installation are frequently provided with daughter craft principally because there are usually a number of activities which take place on oil rigs known as "overside work", during which it is considered that the personnel engaged in the work are at risk of falling into the sea. Such work may only take place if there is provision on hand for immediate rescue and so two installations are so engaged at the same time the mother ship can stand by at one while a daughter craft stands by at the other. The Viking Provider has two daughter craft each deployed and recovered with motion compensated davits. These craft manufactured by Norsafe and designated Munin 950 were the subject of a separate article in the last edition of OSJ. They look as if they would be more at home in Monte Carlo than in the North Sea, however in addition to good looks they fulfil the essential requirement of providing the two crew with a comfortable environment in which they can remain for hours if necessary.

As well as the two daughter craft an additional conventional FRC is provided and should the weather be sufficiently rough to prevent the launching of any of this equipment the ship has a Dacon Scoop on both the port and starboard sides. The Dacon Scoop is yet another item of equipment which is now commonly fitted to standby vessels, to allow overside work on board the installation even in poor weather conditions. The scoop can best be described as a semi-rigid net held out from the side of the ship by a hydraulic crane. The principle is that the ship should steam slowly towards the person or persons in the water so that they are eventually caught in the net. The crane then lifts the net up and the person is recovered on board. This activity may be one where a smaller standby vessel might be an advantage since it would probably be a terrifying experience to have the Viking Provider bearing down on you in a five meter swell.

To assist with this particular activity and other slow speed manoeuvres the ship is provided with a Holland Roer variable speed azimuthing thruster which can be lowered from the hull on location. Such thrusters are becoming common on all types of support vessel but are particularly suitable where the vessel is required to proceed forward slowly on a precise course. The thruster can be controlled from either of the bridge wing control stations giving the Master the best possible chance of keeping persons in the water in sight while manoeuvring the ship so that they can be collected by the scoop.

In order to fulfil yet another standby vessel function, that of plotting approaching vessels to make sure that they are not going to run into any of Elf's platforms, it is provided with 3 ARPA radars, which form part of the comprehensive bridge console. This is positioned centrally in the forepart of the bridge, the windows being so arranged that from the seat at the console the watchkeeper has an excellent view forward and to port and starboard with no blind spots. This essential requirement was in the past more or less ignored by many naval architects but is now, to the relief of all watchkeepers, becoming accepted practice.


 

SHIPPING COMPANY INFORMATION UPDATED IN 2014

Abeille Bourbon
Acergy
Acomarit
Active Offshore
Aker Solutions
Allseas
ALP Maritime
Arctia Shipping
Arendal Offshore
Aries Offshore
Arktikmor
Atlantic Offshore
Axis Offshore
Bergen Offshore
Bibby Offshore
Blue Star Line
Boa Offshore
Boston Putford
Bourbon Norway
Bourbon Offshore
BP
Branding Offshore
British Antarctic Survey (New)
Brovig Offshore
BUE Marine
BUE Viking
Bukser og Bergung
Deep Sea Supply
Deepocean
DOF
DOF Subsea
Eide Offshore
Eidesvik
ER Schiffahrt
Esvagt
Fairmount
Fairplay Towage
Farstad
Femco Management
FS Shipping
Fugro
Gardline
Geoships
Golden Energy

GulfOffshore Norg
Gulf Offshore UK
Hanzevast Capital
Harms Bergung
Harrisons
Hartmann Offshore
Havila Shipping
Heerema
Irish Mainport

Island Offshore
JPKnight
K Line Offshore
Maersk Supply
Marine Carrier AB

Marine Subsea
Myklebusthaug
Chornomornaftogaz
NAO
N-Sea
Nomis
Nordic American
Nordane Shipping
North Sea Shipping
North Star
O.H.Meling
OIL
Olympic Shipping

OOC
OSA
Ostenjo Rederi
PetroBaltic
Portosalvo
Rem Offshore
Remoy Managment
Rovde Shipping
SBS
SeaMar Shipping
Sealion
Seaworx
Siem Offshore
Simon Mokster
Smit Lloyd
Smitwijs
SMS
Solstad
Subsea7
Stirling
Surf
Technip
Trico Offshore
Tschudi Offshore
Troms Offshore
URAG
URS
Varada Marine
Vestland Marine
Viking Supply
Volstad Shipping
Vroon
Vroon Standby
World Wide Supply
Zafiro Marine
 

 



 

 

 

 

ALL CONTENT OF THIS SITE REMAINS THE PROPERTY OF THE WRITERS AND THE PHOTOGRAPHERS AND MUST NOT BE REPRODUCED WITHOUT PERMISSION